Filipino Weddings

Filipino weddings are impressively large, reflecting family traditions and ancient symbols. Couples have many sponsors (godparents who are witnesses in the ceremony), normally chosen among relatives or very close friends, and the groom’s family is the one typically covering the wedding expenses.

Most Filipino brides wear a white wedding gown and veil, in case they don’t opt for the white version of the traditional dress, the baro’t saya, but you will never see them wear pearls, considered bad luck for their future married life. Grooms wear an untucked embroidered shirt made of pineapple fiber (barong tagalog) with a t-shirt underneath and black trousers.

The groom is the one who arrives first for the ceremony, before the bride, to greet the guests. Filipino wedding ceremonies involve metaphorical elements, such as candles (lit by the couple as a symbol of the light of Christ), arrhae (13 gold coins the groom offers to his bride as a sign of prosperity), a veil (covering the couple’s shoulders as a symbol of unity) and a vugal (cord) looped into the figure eight and put around the bride and groom’s collars to suggest fidelity.

Filipinos love to party like crazy during lavish wedding receptions, and sometimes they will continue until early morning.  That's why I love them.